Click it or ticket

Click it or ticket

NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) will be implementing this years Click it of Ticket safety campaign starting May 21, 2012 and going through June 3, 2012. This is billed as a “High Visibility Seat Belt enforcement” campaign.

Summary from Traffic Safety Facts 2009: A Compilation of Motor Vehicle Crash Data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and the General Estimates System

Here are some of the facts in the latest Traffic Safety Facts Report (2009) compiled by the U.S. Department of Transportation.

    Fatal crashes decreased by 9.9 percent from 2008 to 2009, and the fatality rate dropped to 1.14 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2009.

  • The injury rate per 100 million vehicle miles of travel decreased by 6.3 percent from 2008 to 2009.
  • The occupant fatality rate (including motorcyclists) per 100,000 population, which declined by 22.7 percent from 1975 to 1992, decreased by 26.8 percent from 1992 to 2009.
  • The occupant injury rate (including motorcyclists) per 100,000 population, which declined by 13.6 percent from 1988 to 1992, decreased by 40.0 percent from 1992 to 2009.
  • The nonoccupant fatality rate per 100,000 population has declined by 60.2 percent from 1975 to 2009.
  • The nonoccupant injury rate per 100,000 population has declined by 51.9 percent from 1988 to 2009.
  • The percent of alcohol-impaired driving fatalities has declined from 48 percent in 1982 to 32 percent in 2009.

Summary of Police-reported Motor Vehicle Crashes

  • More than 5.5 million police-reported motor vehicle crashes occurred in the United States in 2009. Twenty-eight percent of those crashes (1.52 million) resulted in an injury, and fewer than 1 percent (30,797)
    resulted in a death.
  • Midnight to 3 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays proved to be the deadliest 3-hour periods throughout 2009, with 1,024 and 1,072 fatal crashes, respectively.
  • Sixty-one percent of fatal crashes involved only one vehicle, as compared with 32 percent of injury crashes and 32 percent of property-damage-only crashes.
  • Nearly one-half of all fatal crashes in 2009 occurred on roads with posted speed limits of 55 mph or more, as compared with 23 percent of injury crashes and 23 percent of property-damage-only crashes.
  • Collision with another motor vehicle in transport was the most common first harmful event for fatal, injury, and property-damage-only crashes. Collisions with fixed objects and noncollisions accounted for only 19 percent of all crashes, but they accounted for 46 percent of fatal crashes.
  • Thirty-two percent of all fatal crashes involved alcohol-impaired driving, where the highest blood alcohol concentration (BAC) among drivers involved in the crash was .08 grams per deciliter (g/dL) or higher. For fatal crashes occurring from midnight to 3 a.m., 66 percent involved alcohol-impaired driving.

Summary of Vehicles Involved in Crashes

  • More than 95 percent of the 9.6 million vehicles involved in motor vehicle crashes in 2009 were passenger cars or light trucks.
  • Large trucks accounted for 7 percent of the vehicles in fatal crashes, but only 2 percent of the vehicles involved in injury crashes and 3 percent of the vehicles involved in property-damage-only crashes. Of the 3,215 large trucks involved in fatal crashes, 73 percent were combination trucks.
  • The proportion of vehicles that rolled over in fatal crashes (21.4 percent) was more than 4 times as high as the proportion in injury crashes (5.2 percent) and nearly 18 times as high as the proportion in property damage-only crashes (1.2 percent).
  • Compared with other vehicle types, utility vehicles experienced the highest rollover rates in fatal crashes (32.3 percent) and in injury crashes (9.3 percent). Pickup trucks experienced the highest rollover rate in property-damage-only crashes (2.3 percent).
  • Fires occurred in 0.1 percent of the vehicles involved in all traffic crashes in 2009. For fatal crashes, however, fires occurred in 2.9 percent of the vehicles involved.
  • Regardless of crash severity, the majority of vehicles in single- and two-vehicle crashes were going straight prior to the crash. The next most common vehicle maneuver differed by crash severity: negotiating a curve for fatal crashes, turning left for injury crashes, and stopped in traffic lane for property-damage-only crashes.
  • Motorcycles in fatal crashes had the highest proportion of collisions with fixed objects (25.0 percent), and large
    trucks in fatal crashes had the lowest proportion (3.7 percent).

Statistics about the Drivers, Passengers, Pedestrians, and Pedalcyclists involved in police-reported motor vehicle crashes in 2009

  • A total of 33,808 people lost their lives in motor vehicle crashes in 2009. Another 2.22 million people were injured.
  • The majority of persons killed or injured in traffic crashes were drivers (63 percent), followed by passengers (28 percent), motorcycle riders (4 percent), pedestrians (3 percent), and pedalcyclists (2 percent).
  • Per 100,000 population, persons 21 to 24 years old had the highest fatality rate, and persons 16 to 20 years old had the highest injury rate. Children 5 to 9 years old had the lowest fatality rate, and children under 5 years old had the lowest injury rate per 100,000 population.
  • For every age group, the fatality rate per 100,000 population was lower for females than for males. The injury rate based on population was higher for females than for males in every age group, except for people over 74 years old.
  • Of the persons who were killed in traffic crashes in 2009, 32 percent died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes

Summary of information by State

  • Traffic fatalities dropped by 10 percent from 2008 to 2009 for the Nation as a whole. Forty-one States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico showed decreases, ranging from 1 percent to as much as 26 percent.
  • The pedestrian fatality rate per 100,000 population was 1.33 for the Nation. Florida had the highest rate (2.51), and Wyoming, with two pedestrian fatalities, had the lowest rate (0.37). O About 1.9 percent of all traffic crash fatalities in 2009 were pedalcyclists. Maine, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia reported no pedalcyclists killed.
  • In 2009, all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico had seat belt use laws. All 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico also had laws requiring children of certain ages to be restrained in child safety seats.
  • Motorcycle helmets were required for all riders in 20 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico in 2009. Twenty-seven States had helmet requirements with exceptions (age, rider type, roadway type), and three States
    (Illinois, Iowa, and New Hampshire) did not require helmets at all.
  • In 2009, it was a criminal offense to operate a motor vehicle at a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 g/dL or above in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico.

All information recieved from reports published at www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov